On the Divide

Historically, and in my personal lifetime, when a catastrophic event (large or small scale) came, it often brought communities and families together. A commonality rose to the surface: humanity. 

This is not one of those times. 

The waves of this crisis divide us. Additionally, in this age of “technologically connected” the spotlight on just how divided blinds, enlightens, and devastates.

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I’m tired. In some ways I feel like the sick I had at the beginning of March just won’t let go. It could also be because of seasonal allergies, my throat appears to be

Covid-19 and Down Syndrome: Starter Info

Who knows?

I think it’s natural, as a parent, to try to – to want to – protect. Therefore, sometimes we don’t address issues, important stuff, that needs to be faced together, because we don’t want to share the burden of knowledge. 

That said, If there’s anything I’ve learned as Marcus’ mom it’s this: never assume he doesn’t know or won’t understand. 

Early, often, and honest explanations are important to Marcus’ ability to cope with difficult situations.

Checking In

I’ve been sick. Not THE sick, but sick.

When I first started coughing, I went to a “quickie mart” in the mall across from the hotel and bought chips, chocolate, water, cough drops, and a thermometer. The man at the register asked, “Are you panic buying?” I didn’t quite understand him at first, so I replied with a little nervous laugh. He went on, “Everyone is panic buying…they have bought all of the sanitizer and alcohol.” Finally, I understood him. “Ah,” I said, flustered but trying to look cool, “As long as there’s still whisky, we’ll be alright.” When I

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