Marcus, Aristotle, and Douglas Adams Advice

In my young adulthood, I frequently said, “This is no time to panic…” Often at random moments, to no one in particular, mostly at work. 

After reading the book series, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, then seeing the classic BBC TV of the same name, the simpler phrase “Don’t panic” including a cheeky smirk and a deep sigh is a common refrain in my household. 

The first time I recall Marcus purposefully using the phrase “Don’t panic” was a memorable audition night in Denver seven or so years ago. 

What are you going to be?

Marcus dropped one of his wisdom bombs on me while we were at our favorite coffee shop. We’re regulars at one particular Scooters where they are nice to us. The general public, on occasion, puts me on edge. You see, I’m a bit paranoid and particularly attentive to how folks look at and react to us because Marcus, my adult son, has Down syndrome, and the patrons and employees at this Scooters tend to acknowledge Marcus but not bristle, are nice but not patronizing, a surprisingly tricky balance for some.

That month a website called The Road We’ve Shared

What Marcus Taught Me in Iceland

The Most Important Lesson from our Trip Happened in Iceland.

Can you imagine what it’s like to have your own child’s value, as a human being, debated? A world where you regularly encounter the opinion of scientists and doctors who are literally working to eliminate the entire segment of humanity of which your child is a part…and it all happens without public outrage. In fact, it is happening throughout entire cultures.

I frequently listen to the band Of Monsters and Men when I am writing. I love their lyric videos and their melodies drive emotion. Of Monsters and Men happen

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